How to Wear a Head Scarf

by Michelle Powell-Smith

Head scarves are a trendy and stylish accessory. They are also a great way to manage a bad hair day, deal with bangs or growing out layers, or add color and style to any outfit. There are several ways to wear a head scarf, depending on the shape of the scarf and what you would like as a final look, whether fresh and trendy or classic and chic. Choose the right one to make the most of this trend.

Items you will need

  • Hair brush
  • Hair clips or elastics
  • Bobby pins
  • Head scarf
Step 1

Tie a long, narrow scarf around your head when you have your hair back in a ponytail. This is a great way to dress up a basic ponytail. Use a few bobby pins to secure the head scarf into place and keep it from slipping during the day. Add a little height in front of the head scarf. This is a great way to deal with unwashed hair or a bad hair day.

Step 2

Use a scarf of any shape to add some color and style to a basic ponytail. A long, skinny scarf can simply be tied, but you should fold a square scarf into a narrow strip.

Step 3

Wrap a long scarf around your forehead, covering the front of your hair line. This a great look if you are growing out your bangs or awkward layers. Hang your head upside down while tying the scarf if you have longer hair.

Step 4

Take a large square scarf and fold in half to form a triangle. Place the long side of the triangle along your hairline and tie underneath your hair. Worn loosely, this is a great way to protect your hair while driving or walking.

Step 5

Center the long side of a folded square scarf under your hair. Tie it at the top of your head, leaving your bangs free. Bring the back point of the triangle up and tuck it under the headband. This is a great, playful retro look with a head scarf that work well with short hair. Wear head scarves like this with longer hair by putting your hair up before putting on the head scarf.

About the Author

Michelle Powell-Smith has been writing on a variety of subjects from finance to crafts since 2004. Her work appears on various websites. She holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in art history from the University of Missouri-Columbia, which has provided strong research skills and a varied range of interests.