How to Get Rid of Fat on Back of Neck in Women

by Lillian Downey

Fat accumulates all over the body -- even in some strange places like the back of the neck. Because fat accumulates slowly throughout the body, you must lose it slowly throughout your body if you want to see it disappear in any one particular place. Engaging in a total-body fat loss program will take care of the fat on the back of your neck over time. There's no way to lose just neck fat without resorting to cosmetic surgery.

Step 1

Start a 5 day per week exercise program that consists of heart-pumping, sweaty physical activity at least 30 minutes per day. This kind of exercise burns fat and calories, which will eventually lead to fat loss in your neck.

Step 2

Add in two sessions of weight training per week that consist of at least 8 to10 different strength-building exercises, recommends the American College of Sports medicine. While building muscle in your neck won't help your cause much, building muscle all over helps speed up weight loss. Extra muscle requires additional calories, so you'll burn more throughout the day.

Step 3

Talk to your doctor about a healthy eating plan and the number of calories you can safely cut to lose weight without depriving your body of vital nutrients. Focus on fruits and vegetables to fill you up without contributing a lot of calories to your meals. Add in lean meats, seeds, legumes, nuts, fat-free dairy and plenty of water. Skip junk food and fast food most of the time.

Step 4

Stick to your program vigilantly. Get a buddy to help motivate you if it helps. If you have a lot of excess body fat, it may take some time before you lose enough weight all over your body for it to be evident in your neck area.

Step 5

Talk to a plastic surgeon about liposuction or procedures to remove excess fat and skin from the back of your neck. If diet and exercise don't give you the results you want and you're already at your healthy weight, surgery might be your best option.

About the Author

Lillian Downey is a writing professional who has served as editor-in-chief of "Nexus" literary journal and as an assistant fiction editor at the "Antioch Review." Downey attended Wright State University, where she studied writing, women's studies and health care.

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