How to Make Your Hair Into an Afro

by Jonae Fredericks

The afro is a symbol of black culture and the au naturel approach of black hairstyles. Interest in the halo or dome-shaped style peaked in the U.S. during the 1960s; a trend which continued well into the 1970s. Since then, interest in the afro has reemerged. In fact, both males and females of all ages wear the afro hairstyle. If you would like to make your hair into an afro, you can do so whether your hair is naturally curly or not.

Items you will need

  • Shampoo
  • Towel
  • Volumizing mousse or almond oil
  • ½-inch barrel curling iron
  • Wide-toothed comb
  • Fine-toothed comb
  • Hair spray
Step 1

Wash your hair using your regular shampoo. Rinse your hair thoroughly after washing and remove excess water with a towel. Apply a volumizing mousse to your hair if it is straight or an almond oil to your hair if it is already curly. Dry your hair as usual.

Step 2

Curl your hair with a ½-inch barrel curling iron if your hair is straight. Curl your hair in ½-inch sections, making sure every inch of your hair is curly, if you are starting out straight.

Step 3

Comb out your curls using a pick comb. Whether your curls are natural or set in place with a curling iron, run the pick comb through your hair from root to tip. Combing will separate your curls and give your hair that fuller, afro look.

Step 4

Run a fine-toothed comb through your hair once you have done so with the wide-toothed comb. The fine-toothed comb will further separate your curls, creating a wide afro.

Step 5

Pat your hair into shape using your hands. Spray your afro with hairspray to hold it in place after shaping it into a dome.

Tips

  • If you do not have a pick comb, you can use a wide-toothed comb, which will also work to get the job done.
  • If you have straight hair and have the time, you can set your hair in small rollers instead of using the curling iron.

Warning

  • Don't forget to turn off the curling iron immediately after use to prevent burns or fire hazards.

About the Author

Jonae Fredericks started writing in 2007. She also has a background as a licensed cosmetologist and certified skin-care specialist. Jonae Fredericks is a certified paraeducator, presently working in the public education system.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images