Homemade Wrinkle Releaser

by Michelle Powell-Smith

Commercially available wrinkle releasers freshen and smooth clothing without an iron. Speed up your morning and cut the ironing with an easy and affordable homemade wrinkle releaser. Use homemade wrinkle releaser spray on nearly any garment, including some dry clean-only garments, but do be careful of items that may water spot or discolor.

Function

Wrinkle releaser sprays work by softening and relaxing the fibers of the fabric. The dampened fabric is then pulled and tugged smooth to remove wrinkling. A light fragrance freshens the garment. After treatment, fabrics should be smoother and softer.

History

While linen sprays and fabric softeners for use in the laundry have been widely used for quite some time, wrinkle releaser is a somewhat newer innovation. Modern fabrics require less ironing than fabrics commonly used to, and fewer people are willing to iron. Wrinkle releaser is a modern solution that fits into a busy lifestyle and an easy care wardrobe.

Features

Choose a fine mist spray bottle for your homemade wrinkle releaser. You want to mist the fabric, just barely dampening it, rather than saturating the fabric. Look for a good-quality spray bottle in the health and beauty section of discount or drug stores or re-use a sprayer you already own.

Types

Homemade wrinkle releaser has two basic ingredients. Combine 2 or 3 tbsp. of liquid fabric softener with approximately 20 oz. of distilled water. Use distilled water, rather than tap, to avoid bacterial growth in your wrinkle treatment. In more humid climates, consider combining a high-proof alcohol, like vodka or even rubbing alcohol, with distilled water and fabric softener for a quicker dry option.

Warning

Homemade wrinkle releaser spray is an excellent choice for sensitive skin or noses. Choose an unscented fabric softener to avoid irritating allergies. Test your homemade wrinkle spray on the inside of a hem or waistband to make sure that it does not mark or spot your clothing.

About the Author

Michelle Powell-Smith has been writing on a variety of subjects from finance to crafts since 2004. Her work appears on various websites. She holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in art history from the University of Missouri-Columbia, which has provided strong research skills and a varied range of interests.

Photo Credits

  • clothes hanging on hanger isolated image by dinostock from Fotolia.com