First Signs of Pregnancy After IVF Embryo Transfer

by Candace Webb

Once you have undergone an in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryo transfer procedure, your excitement begins to mount. You may find yourself noticing every change in your body, every cramp, every possible symptom of pregnancy, while wondering whether one of the embryos successfully implanted itself into your uterus. Stress, anxiety and a variety of common illnesses can mimic pregnancy symptoms. Knowing what early pregnancy signs to watch for following an IVF embryo transfer will help you relax.

Spotting

The first sign of pregnancy you might notice after your IVF embryo transfer procedure is light bleeding or spotting. The blood you see will be dark brown or possibly black in color. If this happens, it is a good sign, because it means the embryo has implanted itself into your uterus. If, however, the bleeding is bright red or close to when your period is scheduled to begin, it probably is not caused by implantation bleeding.

Cramping

Another early sign of pregnancy that may present itself after you undergo an IVF embryo transfer procedure is cramping. Many women describe the cramping experienced with implantation as being similar to menstrual cramping. It will be felt along the lower half of the abdomen and should only continue for a day or two, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Breast Tenderness

As early as two weeks after your IVF embryo transfer procedure, you may notice that your breasts become tender. According to the Mayo Clinic, this is caused by the milk ducts preparing to manufacture milk and breastfeed.

Basal Body Temperature

Your body temperature will increase as you begin to ovulate and will remain higher than normal until your period starts, according to the Mayo Clinic. When your basal body temperature remains elevated for two weeks or longer, it may mean you are pregnant.

About the Author

Candace Webb has been writing professionally since 1989. She has worked as a full-time journalist as well as contributed to metropolitan newspapers including the "Tennessean." She has also worked on staff as an associate editor at the "Nashville Parent" magazine. Webb holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism with a minor in business from San Jose State University.

Photo Credits

  • pregnant #10 image by Adam Borkowski from Fotolia.com