Disadvantages of Organic Food

by Nina Makofsky

Organic food has become an enormously popular trend, with even places like Wal-Mart and Costco selling some organic products. While most people concur that organic food tends to be more healthful, it does have some disadvantages. Before you go all-organic in the kitchen and household, consider when it pays to shop organic and when it's better to opt out.

Cost

There is no arguing that many health food stores and natural outlets have a premium price tag on organic food. If you are trying to eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables every day, going fully organic can break the budget. If the choice is between plenty of conventionally-grown fresh fruits and vegetables or smaller amounts that are organic, quantity of vitamins and minerals wins over the quality of the farming methods.

Convenience

It can be extremely challenging to maintain an organic kitchen. While some people invest in organic produce delivery and others grow their own, there will always be those foods that are harder to buy organic. Try going organic for certain produce that retains more pesticides, such as kiwi fruit, grapes, strawberries, leafy greens and apples.

Labeling

With many companies jumping on the organic bandwagon, you may wonder why some of your local and small farms are resisting. The fact is, the process for gaining the official organic certification is complicated, long and costly. Many small farmers cannot afford the investment in time and money it takes to get the certification, even if they are incorporating organic farming techniques. The best way around this problem is to go to farmers' markets or small farms that welcome visitors and ask about the growing methods.

Shipping

Organically grown does not equate with locally grown. Those long-stemmed organic strawberries at the market in winter have come a long way, and used a lot of fuel in the process, just to sit on the shelf. It is far better for the environment and often better-tasting to eat fresh, locally-grown fruits and vegetables, regardless of the growing method. Eating with the seasons means that your diet stays diverse and nutritious.

About the Author

Nina Makofsky has been a professional writer for more than 20 years. She specializes in art, pop culture, education, travel and theater. She currently serves as a Mexican correspondent for "Aishti Magazine," covering everything from folk art to urban trends. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Mills College.